Accredited Checking Technician Jobs Provide A Good Vocational Career

Accredited checking technician jobs are similar to pharmacy technician jobs. While the latter receives the prescription, takes out the drugs from shelves and packs them, the former checks the dispensed prescription for its accuracy. Checking, labeling and packing have all become formal procedures and the accredited checking technician will be trained in all these in a pharmacy context.

Training to Become an Accredited Checking Technician

The technician training is done under vocational training schemes, and accredited checking technicians are NVQ 3 or BTEC certified (in UK). The checking technician is trained to check that:
The medicine or product matches the prescription and is in date
It is assembled using correct equipment and processes
It is packed and labeled appropriately
Appropriate records are made
Health, hygiene and safety procedures are followed at all times
To equip the technician with the required competencies, the vocational training program will typically:
Start with an explanation of the legal and professional issues involved in checking, packing and labeling pharmacy medicines
Train the technician to work with other staff of the pharmacy
Make the technician go through typical checking exercises
Involve a final project to check 1000 items at a hospital without errors
Proceed to a test and assessment by a panel of pharmacists and technicians
Involve a probation period during which his or her performance is observed
By the end of such a course, the trainee would have gained the practical skill needed to check dispensed medications against the prescription. The person would typically check only items dispensed by another person, not by himself or herself. The prescription would also have undergone review and approval by a pharmacist regarding its correctness and accuracy.

Self-checking by non-pharmacists (like an accredited checking technician) is also considered acceptable once the technician has gained sufficient experience attested by their dispensary manager. To continue their checking career, the technicians need to be reassessed every two years.

Role of the Accredited Checking Technicians

The role to be assigned to accredited checking technicians have been the subject of some debate. Pharmacies have considered entrusting them with more responsibilities to cope with the serious shortage of pharmacists.

Some groups have opposed this move on the ground that technicians cannot be entrusted with responsibilities requiring professional knowledge. They see the move as an attempt to cut costs, replacing high cost pharmacists with lower cost technicians.

As we saw above, accredited checking technicians have to undergo a rigorous program of training and assessment before they are allowed to check.

Accredited checking technicians perform a labor-intensive function that also requires specialized vocational skill. In doing this, they relieve the pharmacist to focus on the more important tasks of checking all prescriptions, and other tasks requiring a higher level of professional knowledge.

Without the support of pharmacy technicians and accredited checking technicians, the pharmacist will be overburdened in any busy dispensary, and not be able to provide a sufficiently satisfactory level of service.

The above, in essence, is the significance of accredited checking technician jobs.

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Airline Customer Service Careers

The US airline industry is gradually moving away from all the bloodletting that brought about the bankruptcy of four major carriers over the past several years while at the same time marked the emergence of many discount carriers into the forefront of the business. Indeed, the face of commercial aviation has changed dramatically over the past decade and it now appears that the worst is behind us. This does not mean that further layoffs and downsizings are not possible, but for the person seeking a customer service career in the aviation industry, the future has brightened considerably.

Customer service opportunities with the airlines includes the following job titles: reservation agents, ramp agents, line service technicians, customer service agents, baggage handlers, and various management positions including station manager, customer service manager, and airport operations manager. Similar job titles exist, but for the sake of brevity in using the term “airline customer service” I mean those ground personnel tasked with assisting customers as they get to and from their destinations.

So, exactly who is hiring? Well, on any given day just about everyone could be. The turn over rate for customer service personnel can be high, depending on the airline and the working conditions. To make it easier on you, the following is a break down of the various airlines who hire customer service agents. In most cases you will work directly for the airline but in some cases a position may be with a vendor or for the airport authority itself.

<b>Legacy Carriers</b> – American, Continental, Delta, Northwest, United, and USAir all qualify as legacy carriers. Simply defined these are the carriers that helped the airline industry get its start in the U.S. Out of the six listed, only American and Continental have avoided bankruptcy. Thus, a career with a legacy carrier can be a risky proposition.

<b>Foreign Carriers</b> – Many foreign carriers fly in and out of the U.S. and are worth a look. Depending on the carrier selected, you may be required to speak the language of the carrier’s country in addition to speaking English. Chief carriers include: Air Canada, Mexicana, Air France, British Airways, Japan Airlines, Korean Airlines, KLM, Lufthansa, and flag carriers as well as discount carriers from dozens of countries from around the globe.

<b>Discount Carriers</b> – Some of the strongest carriers in operation today are discount airlines. Two of the best are Southwest and JetBlue, both of which are expanding and are hiring on a regular basis. Other discount carriers include: Spirit, USA3000, and many small more regional carriers.

<b>Regional Operators</b> – Working as “feeder” airlines for the big carriers, regional operators include Colgan, Republic, Shuttle America, American Eagle, Comair, and Great Lakes. Some of these carriers are awash in cash with very promising futures.

<b>Charter Carriers</b> – A few airlines fly chartered flights principally although some have scheduled flights too. Some of the more noted charter operators include: Miami Air, Xtra Airways, and Sun Country.

<b>Cargo Carriers</b> — Not every carrier moves people. Some carriers move goods, merchandise, and equipment. Customer service jobs as sales agents and equipment handlers are an option for potential employees. Chief cargo companies include: DHL, FEDEX, UPS, Emery Worldwide, and Amerijet.

Two recently launched carriers, EOS Airlines and Maxjet Airways, went through a hiring surge immediately preceding their first flights in Autumn 2005. As with any start up, long term career possibilities are a big question as most start ups eventually fail.

In all, the opportunities for you in the airline industry have improved. While pay for hourly workers is generally low the benefits, including flight privileges, are usually fairly good. In spite of everything, the airline industry remains a point of interest for so many people and with decreasing fuel prices and strength in the economy, the job market for customer service personnel is on an upswing.

A Medical Transcriptionist Career Could Be Just What The Doctor Ordered

A Medical Transcriptionists career could pay off well for those seeking to update their career training. As thousands of jobs are being outsourced and sent overseas in every sector, for those fortunate enough to be within the employment ranks as medical transcriptionists, this sector is projected to grow faster than average for all jobs through 2013. Demand for medical transcription services will be fueled by a growing and aging population. Older age groups receive more medical tests, treatments, and procedures that require documentation. A high level of demand for transcription services also will be sustained by the continued need for electronic documentation that can easily be shared among providers, third-party payers, regulators, consumers, and health information systems.

Growing numbers of medical transcriptionists will be needed to and identify discrepancies in medical reports, amend patients’ records, and edit documents from speech recognition systems . An increasing demand for standardized records should result in rapid employment growth in physicians’ offices, especially in large group practices. Medical transcriptionists held strong employment representation with about 105,000 jobs in 2004. About 4 out of 10 worked in hospitals and another 3 out of 10 worked in offices of physicians. Others worked for business support services; medical and diagnostic laboratories; outpatient care centers; and offices of physical, occupational and speech therapists, and audiologists.Compensation methods for medical transcriptionists vary. Some are paid based on the number of hours they work or on the number of lines they transcribe. The higher earners can forseeably expect more than $20 an hour.

Work conditions that some would envy are what many Medical Transcriptionist encounter. Professional transcriptionist can look forward to working in comfortable settings such as hospitals, physicians’ offices, transcription service offices, clinics, laboratories, medical libraries, government medical facilities, or their own homes. Many medical transcriptionists telecommute from home-based offices as employees or subcontractors for hospitals and transcription services or as self-employed, independent contractors.

Many medical transcriptionists work a standard 40-hour week. Self-employed medical transcriptionists are more likely to work irregular hours—including part time, evenings, weekends, or on call at any time. The future of medical transcriptionist jobs appear to be healthy and bright and shows no sign up declining anytime in the foreseeable future.

Career Development Takes Work

Do you currently have the career of your dreams? If so, congratulations on all your hard work, because I’m quite sure that your success and accomplishment didn’t happen over night. If you do not have the career you have always dreamed of, do not worry, you can get there. Career development isn’t easy, but it is definitely worth it.

Career development can mean a lot of things. Here, for my purposes, I simply mean doing the things you have to do to get the career you really want. The first step in the process of career development is to figure out – really figure out – the career you want to have. This may be harder than it seems. You really need to know yourself, know what you’re good at, and know what excites you. Not many people last long in a career that they hate. Career development begins with taking a close look at yourself. See a career counselor for even more help or to take tests that will help you to determine your personality and jobs that will fit it well.

Once you have determined a career or two that seems like it will fit you and your dreams, continue with your career development by discovering what needs to happen for you to be qualified for the career you want. Career development does not happen in an instant or even in a year, it may take years of hard work to get to where you want to be. It is important to be realistic about your goals and about the process. Does more education need to take place for your career development? Or perhaps you just need some special training courses in your field but you do not need another degree? Find these things out and then begin pursuing it.

Career development is important because I am convinced that it is important that people spend their lives on things they care about and feel like they can do well at. There is nothing worse than spending years of your life in an unsatisfying career. Fortunately, you do not have to let that be the story of your life. Take proactive steps that put you in control of your career development.

I guess what I’m simply trying to say is this: life is hard. Work is hard. Work is much easier and life is much better when it is doing a career that you love. Believe that it is possible for you to have a career that you love and then commit to whatever career development is necessary for you. It will be worth it for years to come.